Step away from the ledge: a survival guide for sports parents

We are in the doldrums of winter and your youth sports team forecast is dreary with a chance of losing it. The long season is wearing on you. Your player has managed to lose one uniform sock and has worn a hole in his $45 warmup pants. That super spirited mom with the team cheers and cowbell is causing your eye to twitch. The motivational speeches from the assistant coach P1010134are wearing thin, and if you get one more team email about snack schedules, you might blow.

The bloom is off the rose, people, and it’s easy to start focusing on the negative. Maybe your team won-loss record isn’t what you thought it would be, or your kid isn’t in the starting lineup every game. We’ve still got a long way to go, so let’s take a step back from the ledge and get some perspective. Read the rest of this entry »


Guest Post: Two steps forward-one step back

Readers, please welcome Gretchen Rose to the Trophy Mom blog. She’s a football mom and will be sharing some of her experiences from time to time. Here’s her first post, just in time for the National Championship game. Give her a big Trophy Mom welcome.

Two steps forward – one step back.

I know that you have seen the car commercials starring Matthew McConaughey. You know the ones – where McConaughey drives around and has a philosophical conversation with us over random topics? The hypnotizing Texas Drawl (God Bless Texas) draws you in to listen to his transcendental talk. Yep, I thought it was Mumbo-Jumbo, too, until I realized he was actually talking to ME!

“Sometimes you have to go back, to actually go forward.”
I actually understood these prophetic words somewhere between Football Bowl Game 15 and 18 during the Holiday Break. (We watched almost all 32 of them by the way). McConaughey made me realize the complexities of my fall season as a Football Mom.  I just thought I was cheering and volunteering for the teams and sport that I love. Maybe it turns out there was more to the project than I knew! Read the rest of this entry »


A push to play sports: The family tradition

Here’s a take on sports parenting from a guy who is just getting into it. Nick Houser is a fairly new dad, and is examining all those family traditions and sports attitudes from the fresh, new eyes of a father to a little guy. As many parents have, Nick has reflected on his own experience as youth sports participant, and shares his thoughts here at The Trophy Mom.

By Nick Houser

I grew up pushed into sports. I think most people my age, boys especially, were pushed into sports. There was a mentality that we had to do something, so it was either sports or work.

Baseball was everything in our house.

My dad tried to play. When he couldn’t go pro as a player, he tried to go pro as an umpire. But he always played in an old man’s league as well. My brothers both played as long as they could, too. One gained a collegiate scholarship.

I still recall the day I decided to quit. Read the rest of this entry »


Life Coaching Giveaway! Transform your life

Last fall I got a really great opportunity to take a course that had the potential to transform my life.* Exaggeration? No, not really. And I’m going to give you the same opportunity for free. Just keep reading.

You at the Center logoCaught between too much and not enough

I found myself in this place where I think a lot of people end up– caught between too much and not enough. Too much stuff to do, too much running around, too much busy. Not enough time, not enough energy, not enough fulfillment. I don’t think you get to this place all it once. It happens gradually, as your family grows, your responsibilities increase, and the “too much” gets added to your life just one grain at a time, until you are overwhelmed and exhausted. Yet at the same time, at a loss to figure out a way to extricate yourself from it, because it all seems so necessary. What do you give up? Feeding the kids? Bad idea. Going to work? Another bad idea. Sleeping? Even worse idea.

That’s when the You @ The Center opportunity came up. Through Enlist Moms, I was selected to participate in Rachel Davis’ 100-Day Course. And even though it came at a really bad time for me, I had the sense to recognize the potential and go for it.

Read the rest of this entry »


Putting YOU at the center

Regular readers will note that they haven’t had much Trophy Mom to read lately.  Sadly, the blog has dropped toward the bottom of the batting order, somewhere between making graduation party decorations and cleaning out the linen closet.

But I’m hoping that will change by the time I complete Day 100 of You @ the Center, a coaching program with Rachel Davis, Ph.D.  The opportunity to take this course came to me through Enlist Moms. I applied, mostly out of desperation, with no real hope of 1) being selected or 2) being able to fit it in to my ridiculous schedule. To my surprise, I was selected, and even though the timing was not so great, I decided that I couldn’t let an opportunity like this pass by. I enrolled, and have just completed week one. Read the rest of this entry »


Taking a 10 year view

When my kids were small, we thought it was adorable that they sidewalk-chalked the driveway with a face off circle and a goal crease and drew a hockey net on the garage door. And so darn precious when they commandeered the Cozy Coupe and drove it in circles, mimicking the Zamboni. And when they made impromtu goalie pads from pillows strapped to their legs and played together for hours we were, well, we were just happy they’d gotten the hell out of the house and stopped whining. Fresh air, togetherness, unstructured play– those are all things that are great for kids. It was so cute. And completely harmless. Like this:

Total Hocke Ad Read the rest of this entry »


How to raise a self-indulgent, entitled athlete in 13 easy steps

They are in the news practically every day. The superstar who thinks he’s above the team. The guy that is amazing on the field, and a complete train wreck off it. The guy who seemingly has it all, then blows it by making poor choices and exhibiting even worse behavior.  From Ben Roethlisberger to Tiger Woods to Lance Armstrong, we’ve seen it over and over. And while it seemingly blows up in the media in one or two days, it takes a lifetime to reach this state. So how do you raise a wealthy, worshipped, successful spoiled athlete? You’ve got to start early, and use this guide. Read the rest of this entry »